288 New Road, Lewes, De 19958 | $484,000

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Property Details

A chance to own in City of Lewes steps away from the Lewes-Rehoboth Canal just off Pilottown Road. Home has been vacant for 22 years and is massive disrepair. The year built and square footage is unknown.
  • MLS Number: 725747
  • Status: Active
  • Price: $484,000
  • Property Type:
  • Area: Lewes And Rehoboth Hundred
  • School District: Cape Henlopen
  • Square Footage: 1
  • Year Built: 1945
  • Bedrooms: 4
  • Full Bathrooms: 1
  • Number of Stories: 2
  • New Construction: No
  • County Taxes: $313
  • Furnished: No
  • Lot Square Feet: 6,970
  • Lot Size Acres: 0.16
  • Water: Public Central Water
  • Sewer: Public Central Sewer

Interior Features

  • Heating: None
  • Cooling: None
  • Flooring: Hardwood
  • Attic: Access Only
  • Appliances: NONE

Exterior Features

  • Style: Farm House
  • Construction Type: None
  • Exterior Type: Wood
  • Roofing: Asphalt Shingle
  • Foundation: Concrete Block


"Credit Score Whack-a-Mole" for Lewes Mortgage Applicants

You may have wondered why there are credit repair companies out there, since the credit reporting agencies have to allow any Lewes consumer to dispute incorrect line items on their own. The big Credit Reporting Agencies (“CRAs”) even have online systems for challenging erroneous information. The Agency must act speedily to investigate and correct any false information. Soooo, why pay someone else to just fill out their form?
The answer seems to be the same one that makes practitioners in the legal profession permanently in demand: it’s in the fine print. And in this case, it could be that some of that fine print is written in invisible ink.
As you can well imagine, speed is vital when a would-be Lewes mortgage applicant finds a credit score that’s lower than expected. The mortgage companies will decide whether you qualify (and how much interest to charge) based largely on that credit score. The actual details about how speedily the CRA must act are all contained in the fine print located in the FDIC’s Consumer Protection regulations, “Procedure in case of disputed accuracy” (6500, § 611). Once you notify the CRA, they have to investigate the validity of your claim and (without charging you a dime) determine within 30 days whether the item is accurate. More fine print describe further protections you have—
PARAGRAPH 2: The CRA has but 5 days to notify the company or person who provided the information about your challenge.
PARAGRAPH 6: The CRA has to provide you the results of their investigation in writing, and, if you’ve asked for it, describe the steps they took to arrive at their decision.
PARAGRAPH 7: If you didn’t know that you had the right to receive the above description, they must furnish it within 15 days after you later request it.
Those sound like pretty solid protections—vitally important, since the CRA can’t just sweep your dispute under the rug, stall, or ignore you altogether. After all, they have to detail in writing how strenuously they worked to protect you! Right?
Except for one problem, which is in PARAGRAPH 8. If the CRA simply drops the disputed item from your current report within the first 3 days, that’s officially considered an expedited dispute resolution. Since the item has been dropped, that might seem to be a solid win. But PARAGRAPH 8 says that if the CRA does that, it no longer has to do anything demanded in Paragraphs 2,6, and 7! It’s as if those protections were written in invisible ink…so that next month, if the company or person just reports the same thing, voila! your credit report might once again go back to Square One. The CRA is supposed to notify you 5 days in advance; but let’s face it, the phrase ‘Catch-22’ comes to mind…or ‘Credit Score Whack-a-Mole’…
What can you do, short of hiring repair agency experts to fix your credit score? Most commentators are in agreement: just stay away from the online dispute forms. Send a registered letter with your dispute, because it usually takes the CRA longer than three days to act on it, so they can’t skip the protections.
And while you’re waiting, why not give me a call? We can start scouting for your new Lewes home! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at russellstucki@remax.net, visit more listings at www.beachrealestate.com.

Branding Delaware Homes Does Marketing One Better

Selling your Delaware home takes marketing, of course. Highlighting its features—the specific details that the Delaware MLS lists for every property—is only the beginning. The number of bedrooms, square footage, lot size—even the architectural style—all help buyers eliminate offerings that won’t satisfy their housing requirements.

These are quantitative marketing specifics that qualify a residence. Most have numbers attached. They’re also the basis for the “comps” that the bank or other mortgage lender will use to estimate your property’s market value. But they are only the first step in selling your Delaware home. They can (hopefully, will) interest buyers—but they don’t do much more than that.

What’s missing is emotion. A point of view. A brand.

For instance, say yours is one of the oldest homes in your Delaware neighborhood. Was it built before 1917? Then it’s out of the ordinary: a genuine antique! It’s historic. In fact, Turn of the Century craftsmanship can be experienced throughout—so the listing blurb will include that kind of language.

So far, so good. But now all we need is that one more thing that assures that your Delaware home will be the one that sticks in prospective buyers’ memories. We need a brand!

Often, a memorable name does the job handily. If your house really is antique, but whose only identity is its street address, naming it could be long past due! 416 Plover Drive might benefit from becoming “Plover House” or “the 416 House” or if the back yard overlooks a bucolic copse, “Oakview House.”

Naming is only one way to make branding an integral element in selling your Delaware home. For a residences that are less distinctive, branding may touch on some external aspect that make living there desirable. A condominium with club facilities and a particularly lively social scene could be championed as “More Than a Condo: a Lifestyle.” If the location is eminently convenient, its brand could be “Life in the Middle of Everything!” If the opposite is true, the property may well be your own “Private Retreat.”

Branding is a creative exercise, so it’s hard to describe exactly what makes it work best. But there are two qualities that mark successful branding. First, it should emblemize an out-of-the-ordinary facet that resonates emotionally (the intellectual appeal has already been covered in the listing details). The other key ingredient is truth. The brand makes a promise that must be kept. Being memorable is only useful in selling a home when the memory is positive—and that means the brand has to ring true.

Putting in the extra creative effort that adds a brand to your home’s marketing blitz is just one of many ways I bring my clients success in selling their Delaware home. Another one of the reasons to give me a call! Call/Text me Russell Stucki at (302) 228-7871, email me at russellstucki@remax.net, visit more listings at www.beachrealestatemarket.com