429 South Spinnaker Lane, Milton, De 19968 | $139,900

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Property Details

Move in ready 2 bedroom 1 bath home with additional parcel included - plenty of room for expansion! Current Home is expandable - Add additional bedrooms, bath or even a garage on additional lot. Walking distance to historic downtown Milton. Large li
  • MLS Number: 723477
  • Status: Active
  • Price: $139,900
  • Property Type:
  • Area: Broadkill Hundred
  • Community: Shipbuilders Village
  • School District: Cape Henlopen
  • Square Footage: 900
  • Year Built: 1990
  • Bedrooms: 2
  • Full Bathrooms: 1
  • Number of Stories: 1
  • New Construction: No
  • County Taxes: $542
  • Furnished: No
  • Lot Square Feet: 5,952
  • Lot Size Acres: 0.14
  • Water: Public Central Water
  • Sewer: Public Central Sewer

Interior Features

  • Kitchen: Kitchen/Dining Room Combo
  • Heating: Heat Pump(s)
  • Cooling: Central A/C
  • Flooring: Carpet, Vinyl
  • Attic: Floored
  • Appliances: Dishwasher, Dryer-Electric, Oven/Range Electric, Range Hood, Refrigerator, Washer, Water Heater Electric
  • Interior Features: Bedroom-Entry Level, Ceiling Fan(s), Insulated Door(s), Insulated Window(s), Pull-Down Attic Stairs, Screen(s), Storm Door(s)

Exterior Features

  • Style: Duplex
  • Construction Type: Stick/Frame
  • Exterior Type: Vinyl Siding
  • Roofing: Asphalt Shingle
  • Foundation: Concrete Block
  • Parking: Driveway/Off Street
  • Porch/Deck/Patio: Porch - Front

Listing Courtesy of JOE MAGGIO REALTY

News Flash! Men, Women House Hunters Differ!

Last week, The Wall Street Journal made it official: they had a slow news day. It was February 11 (that was Wednesday) when they ran the feature story, "A Gender Gap in Real Estate."

This was something Milton house hunters (not to mention those hoping to attract their attention) could certainly appreciate: an article about what men and women consider "very important" when it comes to features in homes. Author Adam Bonislawski based his story on National Association of Realtors® survey information; the results pointed to some dissimilarities between what women and men look for.

Now, I’ve had a good deal of experience helping both men and women house hunters in Milton, so it didn’t come as a complete surprise that their priorities differ. For instance, I was not at all surprised about the contrasting emphases the two put on the importance of having a walk-in closet in the master bedroom. The only surprise was that it was the men who found it much more important (38%-29%)!

What about house hunters’ feelings about the importance of kitchen appliances being new? Same phenomenon: men 38%, women 29% (possibly because appliances are gadgets, and men like the newest gadgets). How important is it that a home be single level? The sexes reverse: Male house hunters think it is very important 18% of the time; women, 31%. I’d bet that within the 18% that are masculine we’d find a disproportionate number of stay-at-home dads.

House hunters registered a big gap when it comes to rating 9-foot or higher ceilings as very important. A miniscule 8% of females agreed, while nearly three times that many of their male counterparts thought so (21%).

One harder to guess feature would have been the desirability of a kitchen island. Nineteen percent of male house hunters found it very important, versus just 8% of the females. Does this mean women are tired of entertaining? Do they no longer consider their masculine counterparts capable of sous chef action? Or is it that more men are taking over the cooking duties?

I’d have to admit, I’m less than certain that these national averages are 100% reflective of what house hunters in Milton prefer. Yes, Milton men certainly value attics (13%) more than the ladies (7%)—they do tend to spend more time up there (but neither are terribly committed to that form of high living). Basements are preferred by close to equal numbers.

Being that these findings are sort of interesting (not fascinating, perhaps, but at least sort of interesting), you might be wondering why at the beginning I thought it was evidence that the WSJ was having a slow news day. It’s because of some tiny print at the bottom of a graph, which gave the date of the NAR survey—all the way back in 2013! More up-to-date is what we find unfolding for today’s Milton house hunters: give me a call to get the latest!

 

3 Budget-Wise Tips for Winterizing Your Sussex County Home

Lewes home owners don’t have to live in the kind of January landscape that features blizzards and snowdrifts to want to winterize their home before the onslaught of the chilliest temperatures. In even the mellowest of climates, winterization is a way to shrink energy bills. And even if the recent shocking downward spirals in world oil prices have sent your home heating costs to the bottom of your budget-tightening "to do" list, remember that if and when you eventually put your Sussex County home on the market, low utility expenses can be a strong selling point. Regardless of how you set your internal thermostat, theBig Three of energy cost reduction always include the following:

Raise the Air Temp; Lower the Water Temp

Two tips that could seem counterproductive will cut energy costs in many an Sussex County home. You’d think you should just switch ceiling fans off until spring, but not so. For cooling, the blades are set to spin counterclockwise so that cool air won’t be wasted down near the floor. The tip is to reverse the fan’s rotation to clockwise. That will act to push warmer air down from the ceiling. Wait until the blades come to a stop, then slide the small direction switch (it’s usually next to the pull cord). The second tip is actually one you can do any time of the year since hot water heaters are usually set to heat to 140 degrees. In truth, most of us don’t need it that hot. Try resetting the temperature to 120 degrees, and see if it’s sufficient. If so, in the course of a year you’ll save more than a few dollars!

Block Air Creep

For a few dollars, a tube of caulk can be a final defense against the creep of cold outside air. Use caulk to seal cracks in the walls and gaps around your windows and doors. In extremes, there are inexpensive extra measures, such as see-through plastic sheets to cover windows with a second seal (doing both would keep the most remote Siberian cabin as buttoned-up as a baby kangaroo). If a drafty door will have to wait until spring for full renewal, an interim trick is to roll up a bath towel and place it against the threshold. This temporary fix keeps out the worst drafts and doesn’t cost a dime.

Take Care of Your Air Conditioner

If you have water-served central air, during the colder months when it’s out of service, good maintenance requires draining the water hoses. Split air conditioners don’t have that issue, but some of them need an exterior cover for preventing drafts (if you haven’t felt any on chilly evenings, it’s not necessary). If you haven’t already removed any window units, better go to the hardware store to buy exterior covers: a lot of chilly air can make its way in through uncovered vents.

The Big Three tips alone comprise a Sussex County home winterization program that costs less than a burger and fries—yet can result in measurable energy savings. If you have found any other simple energy savers, I hope you’ll share: drop me an email, or give me a call at the office!